Sharing the Peace of Christmas

by Becky Luening

One hundred years ago today, a spontaneous ceasefire took place along a large swath of the western front—the line where troops from opposing armies were dug into muddy trenches separated in some places by mere yards, engaged in one of the bloodiest wars in history, World War I. This temporary pause in fighting was borne of a cultural tradition shared by a majority of the  soldiers on all sides, the celebration of Christmas. Troops not only stopped shooting at each other, but actually came out of the trenches to fraternize in no man’s land. They sang together, shared food and drink, and swapped gifts and stories. This very un-warlike event, which came to be known as the Christmas Truce, threatened to weaken men’s resolve to fight. In essence, enemy soldiers, given the chance to meet face to face without threat of violence, could not help but recognize the common humanity of “the other.” For some, taking up arms again when fighting resumed was quite difficult if not impossible.

George MizoAs the celebration of peace in our culture is dwarfed by the celebration of war, I believe that the 1914 Christmas Truce centenary is well worth celebrating, and I hope the story was shared around many a family table today. But in reflecting on this one popular example of peace breaking out during wartime, I also hope that people will remember and celebrate other moments and examples of peace-making between enemies, perhaps less known but no less powerful. One such example is the story of George Mizo’s return to Vietnam in 1988 in search of reconciliation with his former enemy. Mizo’s passion for peace not only led to the founding of the Vietnam Friendship Village that our Committee exists to support, but also paved the way for many different people to establish a relationship with Vietnam based on peace and friendship and healing of the wounds of war.

My wish this Christmas Day is that people all around the world come to recognize our collective capacity for laying down arms (ceasing violence) and recognizing the humanity of “the other,” and begin working together to heal and feed our war-weary, peace-hungry world. Near the end of The Friendship Village [the 2003 film by Michelle Mason], George Mizo says:

“Hope is an illusion. If you want to create something, you have to actively work at it, and not hope that somebody else, somehow, some miracle is gonna happen. . . . We either will create a world of peace, or we won’t. But it’s our choice.”

If you are inspired by the story of George Mizo and the Vietnam Friendship Village, please consider making a charitable donation to Vietnam Friendship Village Project USA today, and when you send us your check or fill out the online donation form, please include a personal dedication to help inform and inspire others in turn. [See examples of dedications in our past newsletters. Please sign up for our snail mail list if you wish to receive our next print newsletter, due out in early 2015.]

 

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